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Southern Comfort Uses Taiwanese Animators to Burn the Word 'ShottaSoCo' Into Your Brain

Опубликовал: azaryan75 в Advertising - Вс, 06 сентября 2015

Southern Comfort Uses Taiwanese Animators to Burn the Word 'ShottaSoCo' Into Your Brain Southern Comfort has become known in the past few years for its quirky, faux-epic TV commercials from Wieden + Kennedy. But the agency and brand launched a new campaign Wednesday that goes in a totally new direction—featuring digital shorts, created in Taiwanese animation, that are designed to worm their way into your newsfeed and teach you a brand-new word to say at the bar.

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That word is "ShottaSoCo," which the liquor brand hopes will become a commonly used, roll-off-the-tongue way of saying "shot of Southern Comfort." W+K partnered with Next Media, the Taiwanese animation company known for its quick turnaround on videos about current events, on the new ads, which feature strange and surreal plots clearly meant will amuse millennials. (W+K turned the scripts over to animators and let them interpret the scenes in their own way.)



The first five ads don't skimp on the word ShottaSoCo, either. In fact, it's practically the only dialogue we hear. Future spots may respond quickly to breaking current events, putting Southern Comfort in the news mix.


Southern Comfort Uses Taiwanese Animators to Burn the Word 'ShottaSoCo' Into Your BrainSouthern Comfort Uses Taiwanese Animators to Burn the Word 'ShottaSoCo' Into Your BrainSouthern Comfort Uses Taiwanese Animators to Burn the Word 'ShottaSoCo' Into Your BrainSouthern Comfort Uses Taiwanese Animators to Burn the Word 'ShottaSoCo' Into Your Brain


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