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Larry Wilmore's Ratings Are 55% Lower Than The Colbert Report, and This Clip May Prove Why

Опубликовал: azaryan75 в Advertising, Marketing, Branding, All News, All Ar - Пн, 29 февраля 2016

Larry Wilmore's Ratings Are 55% Lower Than The Colbert Report, and This Clip May Prove Why Has Comedy Central's late-night talk lineup lost some of its intellectualism since the departures of Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert? Yes, according to quite a few viewers on Reddit, and they can tell you the exact moment they noticed the change.

On Wednesday, The Nightly Show host Larry Wilmore dropped by Reddit for an AMA (Ask Me Anything) session, promoting the return of new episodes next Monday.

While participants raised a wide array of topics, there was one recurring theme: disappointment.

According to several commenters, Wilmore too often falls back on vapid pop culture commentary or race relations in America for his punch lines and segment focuses, abandoning the humorous-but-heartfelt championing of science and reason that was a recurring theme for The Daily Show's Stewart and Wilmore's predecessor, Colbert.

One specific clip seemed to be a rallying point for those disappointed with the tonal shift. It was a Wilmore-moderated panel featuring science advocate Bill Nye, who was asked to defend why we should "give a shit" about water being found on Mars. 

The segment aired back in September, but Reddit users were quick to raise it with Wilmore as the moment that they felt he had turned away from Colbert's legacy of intellectualism.

Check out the clip yourself before we get into the commentary and Wilmore's rather dismissive defense:

"This segment made me so angry," noted one commenter. "Such blatant and proud anti-intellectualism and anti-science for the sake of some cheap laughs on a show that used to pride itself on being entertaining without sacrificing intelligence. Definitely was the deciding factor in losing me as a viewer."

"I'm not going to lie, Larry, that really turned me off from the show," said another. "I've always been a life-long fan of the Daily Show and the Colbert Report, and of you personally, but that incident seemed to signal a change in the tone of the show. It seemed like the show was trying to target the people watching E! and MTV as opposed to the viewers of the Daily Show and Colbert Report."

These weren't isolated opinions. More than 1,000 comments were posted in the AMA about this one clip—meaning more than a third of the entire AMA discussion was centered on this specific topic. A few defended the segment, noting that it gave Nye an opportunity to confront the nation's widespread apathy toward scientific discovery, but most said Wilmore's approach simply worsened the problem by reveling in disinterest rather than mocking it.

"I saw the commercial advertising Bill Nye and got fairly excited because I thought they were going to be discussing key interests of mine—space and science," one Redditor said about the clip. "Instead it was an ambush not only drowning out Nye but heckling the very topics I tuned in to hear about. The whole point of booking a guest that specializes a niche topic is to draw those viewers. They spent the entire panel mocking it. That was not refreshing. I haven't watched since."

Wilmore's response certainly didn't help matters. He essentially shrugged it off with a tone of "what's the big deal?"

"It was just a conversation," Wilmore wrote in the AMA, responding to a question about the Nye segment. "People are allowed to have a point of view. Bill Nye had a great time on that panel. He's been on the show a couple of times. People are allowed to have opinions. For the life of me, I really don't understand why people are so upset that someone would disagree with Bill Nye. I was on Bill's side of that, but still, who cares? It's just a conversation."

As you might imagine, Wilmore didn't win over any fence-sitters by asking, "Who cares?"

"The response Willmore just gave us seems to sum it up," a commenter said. "Not only does he not care, but he thinks his viewers shouldn't care either. Which means that anyone who cares must not be in his demographic of viewers."

Wilmore, for his part, acknowledged that there has been an intentional shift in the Nightly Show's core areas of coverage, largely to help differentiate it from The Daily Show, now helmed by Trevor Noah.

Asked why the Nightly Show "has done nothing but pander to the lowest common racial tensions denominator," Wilmore explained that from Day 1 he and his writers wanted a different focus than The Colbert Report or Noah's Daily Show.

"One of the missions of the show when we started was to be an answer to The Daily Show and focus on race, class and gender," Wilmore wrote. "It's really those three things, though it seems like a lot of talk on race. It's one of the ways we were distinguishing ourselves from The Daily Show."

The kind of criticisms leveled in Wilmore's AMA could be key factors in the show's decline in viewership since it replaced The Colbert Report in January 2015.

The Colbert Report averaged 1.3 million total viewers in February 2014, according to Nielsen. A year later, Wilmore's recently launched Nightly Show was holding a respectable average of 812,000 viewers. Moving forward another year to this month, Wilmore averaged 580,000 total viewers each night in the first week of February.

In other words, Wilmore's audience is 55 percent lower than Colbert's was in the same timeslot and 29 percent lower than Wilmore was attracting a year ago.

The struggle to keep viewers is not Wilmore's alone. A year ago, Jon Stewart's Daily Show was drawing 1.2 million viewers. In the first week of February, Nielsen showed replacement host Noah's audience down by more than 30 percent, averaging 812,000 each night.


Larry Wilmore's Ratings Are 55% Lower Than The Colbert Report, and This Clip May Prove WhyLarry Wilmore's Ratings Are 55% Lower Than The Colbert Report, and This Clip May Prove WhyLarry Wilmore's Ratings Are 55% Lower Than The Colbert Report, and This Clip May Prove WhyLarry Wilmore's Ratings Are 55% Lower Than The Colbert Report, and This Clip May Prove Why


FX and Sports Illustrated Feature 'The Girls of Archer,' Swimsuit Issue-Style

Опубликовал: azaryan75 в Advertising, Marketing, Branding, All News, All Ar - Пн, 29 февраля 2016

FX and Sports Illustrated Feature 'The Girls of Archer,' Swimsuit Issue-Style If this year's Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue feels a little more animated than usual, it's likely because of the characters from FX's Archer. As part of the marketing campaign for the hit animated comedy's upcoming seventh season, the network partnered with Sports Illustrated to feature faux swimsuit shots of its female characters in both the print issue and online.

Last week's Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue included an ad featuring Pam Poovey, one of the characters from Archer. The prominently displayed photography and swimsuit credits—key components of swimsuit issue art—mention two of the show's male characters, Sterling Archer and Ray Gillette. The ad was one of several surprising elements in this year's swimsuit issue, which featured three separate covers and a Snickers back-cover ad with an epic Photoshop fail.

FX and Sports Illustrated Feature 'The Girls of Archer,' Swimsuit Issue-Style

Starting today, an expanded look at "The Girls of Archer" is available as branded content on SI.com's Swim Daily, part of its swimsuit section. The package includes swimsuit shots of the show's three female lead characters—Pam (voiced by Amber Nash), Cheryl Tunt (Judy Greer) and Lana Kane (Aisha Tyler)—and more information about the tie-in between SI and Archer, which has its Season 7 premiere on March 31. Images of Pam and Lana also appear elsewhere on the Sports Illustrated site to drive traffic to the branded content.

FX and Sports Illustrated Feature 'The Girls of Archer,' Swimsuit Issue-Style

FX and Sports Illustrated Feature 'The Girls of Archer,' Swimsuit Issue-Style

FX and Sports Illustrated Feature 'The Girls of Archer,' Swimsuit Issue-Style

"Sports Illustrated's swimsuit issue is a cultural icon, and we were thinking of fun ways we could take part," said Lance Reiss, svp of marketing for FX. "That led us to working on the idea of including the girls of Archer, and we're tying together the print product, the digital product, and it will have a social element to it. ... These are the kinds of ideas that not only push us but help us keep it fresh for a seventh season of a show."

The SI partnership was initially only going to include the digital branded content, but Reiss said, "The more we talked about it, we thought that having an ad that looks organic to the environment that also helps us promote the show is a perfect compliment."

The swimsuit images also serve to tee up the new location for Archer's seventh season: Los Angeles, where the former New York-based international spies are now working as private investigators. "There are some hints there that the show is moving to L.A.," Reiss said.

This is the third year Archer's marketing has revolved around revealing photos of its animated cast. In 2014, FX posted nude photos of Archer's cast to Reddit's /r/GoneWild subreddit. And last year's campaign included "hacked" naked photos from Pam's phone that were posted online.

While Lana would have been "more of a conventional" choice to appear in the swimsuit issue, Reiss said, "Pam is such a crowd favorite and embodies sort of an unabashed spirit that it's fun to do things with her. Last year, we did the leaked photos, and this year, we thought she'd be a perfect compliment. ... Pam is our fun-loving spirit who has a wild personality, and that's what's fun about it."

The swimsuit issue partnership is "just one element" of FX's Season 7 marketing campaign for Archer, according to Reiss. "We have other things in the works," he said. "We have a custom 'turn off your cellphone' message that will be in theaters nationwide that involves some of the characters, so these are layers that we like to build upon."

One early layer of the campaign was a shot-for-shot remake of Magnum P.I.'s opening credits, featuring the Archer cast, which FX posted earlier this month to lay the groundwork for the show's private-investigator arc this season.


FX and Sports Illustrated Feature 'The Girls of Archer,' Swimsuit Issue-StyleFX and Sports Illustrated Feature 'The Girls of Archer,' Swimsuit Issue-StyleFX and Sports Illustrated Feature 'The Girls of Archer,' Swimsuit Issue-StyleFX and Sports Illustrated Feature 'The Girls of Archer,' Swimsuit Issue-Style


CBS Evening News Anchor Scott Pelley's Office Is Like a Floating Museum

Опубликовал: azaryan75 в Advertising, Marketing, Branding, All News, All Ar - Пн, 29 февраля 2016

CBS Evening News Anchor Scott Pelley's Office Is Like a Floating Museum When Scott Pelley assumed the role of CBS Evening News anchor in 2011, he'd had a long and storied career of reporting from war zones, refugee camps and even campaign trails. So when he moved into his office overlooking the CBS newsroom, Pelley filled the space with items that remind him of and pay homage to his career at CBS. Above all else, however, his office is a working space for the team responsible for Evening News' soaring ratings. "I think of my office as a meeting place for our correspondents, producers and staff," Pelley said. "We pull up the chairs around the round table in the middle and talk about writing, reporting and the direction of our coverage. The office has floor-to-ceiling windows that overlook the newsroom one floor below. I always keep the drapes pulled fully back so everyone can spot me and know that my door is open. We're hyper-collaborative. A lot of great ideas are hatched in my office, but they're rarely my own."


CBS Evening News Anchor Scott Pelley's Office Is Like a Floating MuseumCBS Evening News Anchor Scott Pelley's Office Is Like a Floating MuseumCBS Evening News Anchor Scott Pelley's Office Is Like a Floating MuseumCBS Evening News Anchor Scott Pelley's Office Is Like a Floating Museum


The Oscars Is Still an All-Star Destination for Advertisers

Опубликовал: azaryan75 в Advertising, Marketing, Branding, All News, All Ar - Пн, 29 февраля 2016

The Oscars Is Still an All-Star Destination for Advertisers

Actors, directors and costume designers aren't the only ones poised to score on Hollywood's biggest night. The Oscars remains one of the most important events of the year for advertisers.

The average cost of a 30-second spot in this year's three-hour-plus telecast Feb. 28 is expected to be $1.9 million to $2 million, a double-digit bump versus last year and an all-time record, per Kantar Media figures. (The Los Angeles Times reported that a spot could go for as high as $2.2 million.) Past sponsors expected to return this year include AT&T, General Motors, Samsung and Coca-Cola.

While not on the scale of the Super Bowl, brands still see ABC's Oscars telecast as a key venue due to its massive reach and prestige. Advertisers that broke campaigns in last year's show include American Express (which has participated in every Oscars since 1993), Dove and Cadillac.

The Oscars is also a platform for some of agencies' most memorable creative work and breakthrough brand integrations. In fact, one of Adweek's top 10 ads of 2015 debuted during the telecast—Comcast's "Emily's Oz" from Goodby Silverstein & Partners, New York, which imagined The Wizard of Oz through the eyes of a blind girl.

Another ad from Goodby that premiered in last year's show—for Adobe, celebrating the 25th anniversary of Photoshop and set to Aerosmith's "Dream On"—was also a critical favorite. And who could forget those Oscar statuettes made of Lego that were handed out to attendees? Or host Ellen DeGeneres' "epic selfie" using a Samsung Galaxy Note that broke a Twitter record two years ago?

The Oscars is also important for ABC, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' longtime partner. The Disney-owned network, which has telecast the Oscars since 1976 and is under contract to do so through 2020, reaps in the neighborhood of $100 million in ad revenue from the event, most of that going to Ampas in return for rights to air the ceremony. But it still supplies the network a healthy profit.

There are plenty of reasons for marketers to love Oscar. The Academy Awards is one of the few live, tent-pole events remaining, one that drew 37 million viewers last year. Even though ratings were down 16 percent year-over-year, the show still ranked among the top 10 television programs of 2015. It is generally accepted that live content means better retention of ads, and fewer instances of time-shifted viewing.

Insiders predict this year's audience could be way up from last year, with Chris Rock as host. The comedian—not known as one to shy away from controversial topics—is widely expected to address the #OscarsSoWhite protest that looms over this year's proceedings. Meanwhile, the protest has had no effect on ad commitments. ABC confirms that no advertisers have dropped out of the show.

This story first appeared in the Feb. 22 issue of Adweek magazine. Click here to subscribe.


The Oscars Is Still an All-Star Destination for AdvertisersThe Oscars Is Still an All-Star Destination for AdvertisersThe Oscars Is Still an All-Star Destination for AdvertisersThe Oscars Is Still an All-Star Destination for Advertisers


How NBC Could Own the Coveted 18-49 Demographic for a Third Year in a Row

Опубликовал: azaryan75 в Advertising, Marketing, Branding, All News, All Ar - Пн, 29 февраля 2016

How NBC Could Own the Coveted 18-49 Demographic for a Third Year in a Row

NBC won the last two seasons in the adults 18-49 demo, but during last May's upfronts, CBS all but guaranteed it would snatch the demo crown away this season. Instead, NBC held a commanding lead through February, with Sunday Night Football and The Voice bolstered by freshman hits Blindspot and Chicago Med, and a trio of popular December holiday specials: The Wiz Live!, Dolly Parton's Coat of Many Colors and Adele Live in New York City. Thanks to the Super Bowl, CBS has pulled ahead, just barely—averaging 2.5 to NBC's 2.4—leaving NBC in a strong position to three-peat with three months to retake the lead. NBC Entertainment chairman Robert Greenblatt looked back on the successful season run that not even he saw coming.

Adweek: Even with Sunday Night Football and The Voice again, did you expect to lead in 18-49 by as much as 0.4 in the fall?
Robert Greenblatt: I did not. That isn't a guaranteed win for us; we really have to have other things work as well. Usually, you're happy if you win by a tenth of a rating point. But it was a real substantial lead, and that had to do with The Wiz, Coat of Many Colors, Chicago Med and Blindspot working, and a lot of really smart scheduling decisions. Little things that would never be a big topic of discussion for anyone. We always know January and February are tough because The Voice is off, but we're working really hard.

How did you pull off that December run of hit specials?
A couple of years ago we started trying to figure out how do we do more holiday specials, because the iconic ones like A Charlie Brown Christmas are not gettable; they're in license for so long. It dovetails with drama series: If you start the third week in September, you can get nine episodes in the fall before you have to take a break because of production schedules. That means by December, a lot of your dramas are in repeats. We started thinking, can we supplement the schedule with some one-offs that are big events? The big idea three years ago was a musical, which we didn't know if it would ever work or not, much less be a perennial. We got in more and more of these, and they tend to work, so we built them into our overall budget.

Do they help for midseason, too?
If you're going to launch new shows in January, you don't want to be asleep at the wheel in December, because you don't have any audience to promote to. We would never have launched Shades of Blue or Superstore in the doldrums of January with The Voice being off if we hadn't had that promotional base. To have 13 million viewers in The Wiz and 15 million viewers in Dolly Parton to speak to, it's really effective.

You're making more films based on Dolly and her music. Will they also air in December?
Not necessarily, but maybe. It depends on the movie. There's some Dolly movies that are holiday- and family-themed, and there are some that are more adult and sophisticated, which may not be right for the holiday.

The Wiz Live! was a hit, but you won't be bringing back Best Time Ever with Neil Patrick Harris. Did the mixed reception to your live shows this fall change your thinking about live programming?
Not really. The live thing shouldn't be the tail that wags the dog. If that's the best way to do it, then it should be live. Best Time Ever did relatively well, but we just decided that the format wasn't the best format as it developed. I love Neil and he was such a trouper. We could have done that show not live, and probably put together a better show that was cleaner and crisper, but he really wanted to do the high-wire act of live. And we thought, OK, that's how they do it in the U.K.

What did you think of Grease: Live on Fox? Could we finally see a live audience in your next musical, Hairspray, given how Grease was able to pull that off?
I thought Grease was fantastic, and the live audience was great in a lot of ways, but it's not just as simple as having a live audience or not. We've done shows in the past where it would have been ludicrous to have extras in scenes laughing and applauding, like in Nazi-occupied Austria, Neverland or even in Oz. Should we have had munchkins or flying monkeys in the background going crazy after musical numbers? And if the audience isn't visibly worked into the scenes, then they're sitting in a big room somewhere and you just hear disembodied laughing and applause, which is when viewers at home would think we just added a fake laugh track. If we can work an audience easily into a show, as I think we can in a lot of places in Hairspray, we will.

How did you settle on Hairspray for the next musical?
It's hard to find titles that are really broad and popular in the musical world, that are available. I'd love to do Wicked, which is a show that this company owns, but it's a huge asset, it's still in its infancy and it's going to be a movie, so that's not available. When you look at the ones that you can get your hands on, many of them are old-fashioned, and they're shows that I might know really well and like personally, but I don't know that the rest of the world does.

How much did The Wiz's success influence your pick?
The Wiz didn't really impact it. The Wiz emboldened us to do another one. If we'd gone south [in the ratings], we would be questioning it because they are enormously expensive. Everyone thinks every media company just rolls around in their cash, but that [musical] is so expensive to do, and it generates a lot of advertising revenue, but it doesn't generate a lot of profit. So we can't just do these for the fun of them. What The Wiz did tell us is, let's speak to the diverse audience, in as potent a way as we can. Peter Pan was very white. Sound of Music was very white. And I think Hairspray is one of the few shows where thematically, it's about inclusion and literally integrating that music show with black people. It's a very uplifting, positive message, and there aren't a lot of shows where that's inherent. So that rose to the top immediately. Now, the challenge to cast it is a big one, because The Wiz did set that bar. I think these musicals do significantly better if you have big names. Not in every role, because it was so fun to discover [newcomer-turned-Wiz-star] Shanice Williams, but you've got to have some real marquee value, and that's what we're going to look for now. 

CBS has the advantage with the Super Bowl, but how do you like your chances of holding on to the 18-49 crown this season?
I hate predicting, but I will say that a couple months ago, we all assumed that we would fall to second place in the demo. But if we get some more luck—if these new shows stick and we're really smart in terms of scheduling—we could pull it off. But we're not in any way thinking it's a certainty.

This story first appeared in the Feb. 22 issue of Adweek magazine. Click here to subscribe.


How NBC Could Own the Coveted 18-49 Demographic for a Third Year in a RowHow NBC Could Own the Coveted 18-49 Demographic for a Third Year in a RowHow NBC Could Own the Coveted 18-49 Demographic for a Third Year in a RowHow NBC Could Own the Coveted 18-49 Demographic for a Third Year in a Row


To Keep Children Engaged During Prime Time, PBS Will Launch a 24/7 Kids Network

Опубликовал: azaryan75 в Advertising, Marketing, Branding, All News, All Ar - Пн, 29 февраля 2016

To Keep Children Engaged During Prime Time, PBS Will Launch a 24/7 Kids Network Viewers might have wondered if PBS was rethinking its commitment to children's programming after it allowed HBO to snap up Sesame Street last summer. But today the network announced a big play to keep kids watching its shows around the clock.

Later this year, the network will launch a free, 24-hour network for children's programming called PBS Kids. This will let children watch during prime time and other hours when PBS doesn't air kid-centric content.

The channel will be available as a digital subchannel on PBS stations nationwide (joining other PBS digital subchannels like Create and World). The network will also stream it online at pbskids.org and via the PBS Kids Video app, which is available on iOS and Android devices, as well as Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Chromecast, Android TV and Xbox One. The livestream will join the on-demand full episodes and clips that are currently available on the app and online.

PBS will continue to air its PBS Kids programming blocks on the primary network during the morning and afternoon.

"Parents know that PBS Kids makes a difference in their children's lives, which is why so many have said they would value having access to our content throughout the day. Television continues to be the most widely used platform for children's educational content, especially among low-income families," said Paula Kerger, PBS president and CEO, in a statement. "The new PBS Kids 24/7 channel and livestream offered by local member stations ensure that educational media is available to all families, all the time and via a platform that works for them. Given that 54 percent of all children nationwide do not have the opportunity to attend preschool, providing access is a critical element of our public service mission."

After it launches later this year, the PBS Kids livestream will offer integrated games, allowing viewers to switch between a PBS Kids show and a game.

PBS cited Nielsen data that most children's television viewing occurs on weeknights and weekend afternoons and evenings, which is when PBS doesn't air kids programming. And while children have embraced streaming, 68 percent of the network's video content continues to be via live TV.

The news comes as the children's programming market is more crowded than ever. Last summer, Sesame Workshop struck a deal with HBO to premiere new seasons of Sesame Street on the premium cable network. The first episodes under that new deal debuted last month on HBO and will be available on PBS nine months later. In addition to longtime competitors Disney and Nickelodeon, PBS is also facing challenges from streaming services like Netflix and Amazon, which have beefed up their kids programming. Meanwhile, Sprout, which PBS once had a stake in before NBCUniversal bought it outright in 2013, unveiled a brand refresh last fall as part of a push for more original content.

PBS Kids will air PBS shows like Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood, Dinosaur Train, Wild Kratts and Odd Squad, as well as new series Nature Cat, Ready Jet Go and Splash, an upcoming show from The Jim Henson Company that will premiere this fall. The network has not said whether Sesame Street episodes will air on PBS Kids, explaining it is working with individual producers to develop the schedule for the new network.


To Keep Children Engaged During Prime Time, PBS Will Launch a 24/7 Kids NetworkTo Keep Children Engaged During Prime Time, PBS Will Launch a 24/7 Kids NetworkTo Keep Children Engaged During Prime Time, PBS Will Launch a 24/7 Kids NetworkTo Keep Children Engaged During Prime Time, PBS Will Launch a 24/7 Kids Network


CBS Claimed All 10 of Broadcast's Most-Watched Shows for the Second Straight Week

Опубликовал: azaryan75 в Advertising, Marketing, Branding, All News, All Ar - Пн, 29 февраля 2016

CBS Claimed All 10 of Broadcast's Most-Watched Shows for the Second Straight Week It's been two weeks since Super Bowl 50, but CBS is still on a ratings roll. For the week ending Feb. 21, CBS aired all of the top 11 broadcast shows in total viewers, marking the second consecutive week that the network claimed the 10 most-watched broadcast programs.

It's the first time any network has accomplished that feat since Nielsen began reporting live-plus-same-day ratings in December 2005.

The network kicked off last week with Monday's Grammy Awards, which drew the lowest ratings for the telecast in seven years—25 million total viewers—but was still large enough to be the most-watched program. The other top broadcast shows from last week: NCIS (17.3 million), The Big Bang Theory (15.2 million), NCIS: New Orleans (13.4 million), Blue Bloods (10.7 million), Madam Secretary (10.7 million), 60 Minutes (10.7 million), Life in Pieces (9.3 million), Hawaii Five-O (8.9 million), Mom (8.7 million) and Survivor (8.3 million).

A couple notable caveats to CBS' win. While it swept the ratings in terms of total viewers, in the 18-49 demographic only five CBS shows made the top 10: the Grammy Awards (first, 7.7 rating in 18-49), Big Bang (second, 3.8), NCIS (fourth, 2.3), Life in Pieces (tied for seventh, 2.1) and NCIS: New Orleans (tied for ninth, 2.0). ABC's Modern Family, The Bachelor, Grey's Anatomy and The Goldbergs, along with Fox's The X-Files and American Idol, also made it onto the 18-49 lineup. And the broadcast ratings omit AMC's The Walking Dead, which topped all broadcast series last week in live-plus-same day results in both total viewers (13.5 million) and the 18-49 demo (6.6 rating).

CBS won the week in viewers, adults 18-49 and adults 25-54 for the third week in a row, which the network hasn't done in almost two years.

It's unlikely that CBS's top 10 streak will make it to a third week, however, because The Voice returns Monday on NBC. "We always know January and February are tough because The Voice is off, but we're working really hard," NBC Entertainment chairman Robert Greenblatt told Adweek in this week's issue, as his network looks to fend off CBS and claim the 18-49 demo win for the third season in a row. (While NBC led for most of the season among viewers ages 18-49, CBS surged ahead thanks to Super Bowl 50 and now is in front, with a 2.5 demo rating to NBC's 2.4. NBC now has three months to try and retake the lead.)

As CBS celebrated its ratings victory, it also released a statement looking ahead to this year's upfront in light of its recent Super Bowl and Grammy successes: "Super Bowl 50 and the Grammys delivered results that exceeded our client's expectations and surpassed our financial targets. The success of these big events, along with the strength we're seeing in scatter, provide an excellent market indicator as we head into the upfront."


CBS Claimed All 10 of Broadcast's Most-Watched Shows for the Second Straight WeekCBS Claimed All 10 of Broadcast's Most-Watched Shows for the Second Straight WeekCBS Claimed All 10 of Broadcast's Most-Watched Shows for the Second Straight WeekCBS Claimed All 10 of Broadcast's Most-Watched Shows for the Second Straight Week


Real Housewives’ Lisa Rinna Dishes on Yolanda and Brandi, With a Chaser of O.J.

Опубликовал: azaryan75 в Advertising, Marketing, Branding, All News, All Ar - Пн, 29 февраля 2016

Real Housewives’ Lisa Rinna Dishes on Yolanda and Brandi, With a Chaser of O.J.
Specs
Age 52
Claim to fame Star of Bravo's The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills
Base Los Angeles
Twitter @lisarinna

Adweek: What's the first information you consume in the morning?
Lisa Rinna: I wake up and I get the kids ready for school, and I turn on the local NBC news or CNN. I read the New York Post and then I go to the Daily Mail. Then I will check Instagram. I no longer check Twitter because I hire somebody to do that. It's become so negative while I'm doing the show.

Like your recent Twitter war with ex-Housewife Brandi Glanville.
Yeah, that one came out of my reading the Daily Mail. I just sent out a tweet because [Lisa Vanderpump and Kyle Richards] are my friends. I heard [Brandi] say really, really nasty toxic things about these two women that I work with. I try to also, you know, fill myself with some positivity in the morning. I study Kabbalah so I'll scan the Zohar or I will read some Eckhart Tolle. 

Speaking of being positive, you just launched a new lifestyle curation site called From My Lips.
You know, I had somebody approach us and say, "Would you want to do this?" and I said, "Yeah," because I've never been able to have a website that's really worked. We create it and then no one ever mans it and then it just kind of dies. So we had this company come to us and say, "You curate, pick things to talk about and put out there." And I said, "Great, let's try it." So, we're trying.

What do you watch on TV?
I'm a huge TV watcher. [Husband Harry Hamlin] and I, that's our business, so we love TV and movies. I'm a huge Turner Classic Movie channel viewer. I watch old movies constantly. We also binge-watch many shows. We watched Making a Murderer and were completely obsessed. We're watching Downton Abbey, Fargo and Mr. Robot and The People v. O.J.

So tell me about The People v. O.J. Simpson. What's the buzz in Real Housewives-land?
I'm surrounded by people that were part of it, or in it, or lived it. At the time, Harry and I were obsessed with the trial. I have been around so many of the people, whether it's Kris Jenner, Faye Resnick and now Kathryn [Edwards]. You know, it's still a really taboo subject on our show. 

Have you read Faye Resnick's book, Nicole Brown Simpson: The Private Diary of a Life Interrupted?
I have had no desire to read the book. I'd much rather watch the miniseries because I am a huge Ryan Murphy fan. I'm more interested in why O.J. killed Nicole and what really happened. Like, were [victims Nicole and Ron Goldman] having an affair? Was he just at Mezza Luna, which we all used to go to dinner at? How did it all play out? Harry and I know Robert Shapiro really well. So it's close, you know. 

It must be really strange to watch these actors portraying people you know. Is Connie Britton a dead ringer for Faye Resnick?
Dead ringer, I think. She has her whole vibe down. It's been weird to watch [John] Travolta play [Robert] Shapiro because I know Bob so well that that's hard, and it's hard to see Cuba [Gooding Jr.] playing O.J. even though I love him. I just think O.J. should have been somebody else. I have a hard time buying him as O.J.

Did you know O.J?
I mean, I knew him peripherally. I would see him at events and he was always very friendly and he was so charismatic, obviously.

This season of Real Housewives has some fresh blood. What do you think of your new castmates Kathryn Edwards and Erika Girardi?
I like both of them very much. I like Erika very much. She's really interesting and she's very smart. And she's been fun to work with.

Do you think you could see yourself on The Real Housewives for a few more years? Can you handle it?
Oh God, I don't know. It is a hard show to do, because you do take it personally. You can't help it. It's real. It's really happening even though it's still a show. It's not like I have a script. Even when I'm working as an actor, it's really hard to let it go at the end of the day. I'm not somebody who can just drop a character and be myself. It comes along with me. So being myself, it's even harder to drop. It's kind of a mind-fuck to be honest with you.

I'm sure you didn't really want Munchausen brought up during a discussion about Yolanda Foster's illness, and there it was. Or maybe you did…
I mean, the truth of the truth is that really did happen. I'm doing a reality show. I'm supposed to show you my real life. I'm supposed to tell you what really goes on. You know, David Foster and Yolanda were getting divorced and they hid the entire thing from us. We never even dealt with it. So I go, "All right, well what's my job here?" My job is to show up and show you all aspects of my life.  That's what I signed up for. So to me, then, it's very confusing if somebody can pick and choose what they show... Anyway, I think that doing the show has been a great thing but I don't know how long I'll do it. They basically have to ask you [to stay on the show], so whether they ask me or not is always a question. If it's meant to be it'll be. If not, I'm sure I will find something else to do.

This story first appeared in the Feb. 22 issue of Adweek magazine. Click here to subscribe.


Real Housewives’ Lisa Rinna Dishes on Yolanda and Brandi, With a Chaser of O.J.Real Housewives’ Lisa Rinna Dishes on Yolanda and Brandi, With a Chaser of O.J.Real Housewives’ Lisa Rinna Dishes on Yolanda and Brandi, With a Chaser of O.J.Real Housewives’ Lisa Rinna Dishes on Yolanda and Brandi, With a Chaser of O.J.


NBCUniversal Will Start Selling TV Advertising Programmatically This Fall

Опубликовал: azaryan75 в Advertising, Marketing, Branding, All News, All Ar - Пн, 29 февраля 2016

NBCUniversal Will Start Selling TV Advertising Programmatically This Fall After two years of selling its digital video and display inventory programmatically, NBCUniversal is finally allowing programmatic buys on its linear networks as well.

Today, the company announced NBCUx for Linear TV, which will launch as part of this year's upfront. "It's the industry's first national programmatic TV offering at scale," Krishan Bhatia, evp of business operations and strategy, said during a conference call with reporters.

It's an extension of NBCUx, which the company launched last year as a digital programmatic offering after making its digital video and display inventory available for programmatic buying two years ago. "We've seen great success with it, and now we're extending those capabilities to linear television," said Bhatia.

He said that starting in the fall, "advertisers will be able to use data and automation to build media plans for our premium linear TV inventory across NBCUniversal's entire portfolio of cable and broadcast networks." The fall start date means the technology won't be available for advertisers to use during the Summer Olympics in August.

NBCU's data offerings, which also include ATP, its audience targeting platform, and its addressable NBCU+ Powered by Comcast platform, represent "a sea change in thinking about how we create value for our customers," said Dan Lovinger, evp, entertainment ad sales group. "Our advertiser partners have been asking for help with automating their media planning and buying in a data-informed way, and we expect that by adding premium TV inventory to our offering, we'll provide the help that they're seeking."

As part of the new offering, "select advertisers now will be enabled to include traditional TV inventory in their automated media plans via a private exchange using a combination of their own data, third-party data sources and NBCUniversal's premium television inventory," said Lovinger. NBCU will make its inventory and pricing information available to "a select set of demand-side platforms," and the company's client and agency partners can combine that information with their own data sources to build a media plan against their own data sets and target audiences.

"Then, those agencies and clients will issue a media plan that will be subject to inventory availability and pricing at the time and approval on our part," said Bhatia. While it automates only part of the linear television workflow process, he called it "a big step in terms of making that process simpler."

Lovinger said the company wasn't worried that clients using the technology could ultimately save more money than NBCUniversal would like. "We feel that we've got a complete hold on what we're doing here," he said.

NBC's announcement came a day after CBS staked out its own territory prior to the upfronts. The network released a statement touting its recent Super Bowl 50 and Grammys successes, saying they "surpassed our financial targets," along with a strong scatter market, "an excellent market indicator as we head into the upfront."


NBCUniversal Will Start Selling TV Advertising Programmatically This FallNBCUniversal Will Start Selling TV Advertising Programmatically This FallNBCUniversal Will Start Selling TV Advertising Programmatically This FallNBCUniversal Will Start Selling TV Advertising Programmatically This Fall


Custom Spots for Honda Help Promote Comedy Central's Late-Night Comedy Crossover

Опубликовал: azaryan75 в Advertising, Marketing, Branding, All News, All Ar - Пн, 29 февраля 2016

Custom Spots for Honda Help Promote Comedy Central's Late-Night Comedy Crossover Two of Comedy Central's late-night correspondents, Jordan Klepper and Mike Yard, have found a new use for Honda's 2016 Civic: drag racing, at least until the network's legal department wisely steps in.

That's the premise of one of two custom spots for Honda. And it all leads up to Comedy Central's Late Night Showdown, a crossover event that pits members of the network's three late-night series in a Battle of the Network Stars-like event. Klepper, from The Daily Show, and Yard, who appears on The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore, will be joined by @midnight's Ron Funches on a special episode of @midnight Monday night.

To help promote the event, Comedy Central got Klepper and Yard to create custom spots for Honda, including the drag-racing stunt, which debuts tonight during The Daily Show.


The other spot features the two sitting in a Civic on a stakeout waiting for @midnight host Chris Hardwick (who never shows up):

It was Honda that got the ball rolling on Late Night Showdown, after working last year with The Nightly Show on its #KeepIt100 contest to promote the new Acura. Chris Ficarra, svp of integrated marketing for Comedy Central, told Adweek that Honda wanted to go bigger for their next marketing stunt. "We pitched them this idea, and once they expressed interest, we started to build it out together," he said.

Along with the two spots, Comedy Central will create behind-the-scenes videos with Yard and Klepper to push out on social media over the weekend and into Monday. Ficarra said it wasn't difficult to get the three late-night shows on board. "The shows already cross-promote each other," he said.

"We are always looking to push the envelope and engage in a fun and youthful way with our core audience across traditional and digital platforms," said Tom Peyton, assistant vp of advertising and marketing at American Honda. "This opportunity to build these unique vignettes with Comedy Central talent breaks through the clutter in a fun, entertaining and nontraditional way."


Custom Spots for Honda Help Promote Comedy Central's Late-Night Comedy CrossoverCustom Spots for Honda Help Promote Comedy Central's Late-Night Comedy CrossoverCustom Spots for Honda Help Promote Comedy Central's Late-Night Comedy CrossoverCustom Spots for Honda Help Promote Comedy Central's Late-Night Comedy Crossover



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